A Common, but Bad, Idea

Please don’t do this:

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Risk

If you’re an IT executive, which is less risky? Investing a little bit in an effective agile adoption, something that’s been proven at other companies to improve cash flow, increase productivity, and grow revenues…or…hunkering down and cutting costs, knowing that at this time when your business needs you the most you’ll be less productive than

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Agile Architecture – Neither BDUF nor Chaos

I’m often asked how architecture works on agile software projects. It’s a big question, but the core answer, I think, is this: Neither a big, detailed architecture up front nor no architecture at all is a good approach. The former leads to waste. The up-front architecture tends to support features that turn out never to

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Free Agile Product Management Seminar – Nov 11, Denver

I’m hosting a free seminar on Tuesday, November 11 from 1:00-2:30 PM in the Denver Tech Center area. Please join me there and spread the word to others who might be interested.

Here’s a brief

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How to Invest Less and Make More From Your Software Projects

As the saying goes, “Cash is king.” It doesn’t matter how good your P&L or balance sheet looks or how good the business case for your project is, if you don’t have enough cash every month to pay the bills, you won’t stay in business.

With the economy tightening, then, companies are desperately trying

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The Most Useful Release Burn-up I’ve Seen Yet

I often advise teams against using a release burn-up (or burn-down) chart because I’ve seen too many managers try to use them as a stick to beat the team with their original pre-project release estimate. Since velocity changes from iteration to iteration, the size of the release needs to change, as well. Jim Shore has

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Trust

Esther Derby has a good post this morning about how trust is embedded in a context. She writes, “The sort of trust that you need for a productive working relationship is different from the trust you need for a healthy marriage.” She gives some good examples of what trust means on a work

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Kill the Office, or Fix It?

A recent essay in Wired says, “The traditional office, meanwhile, remains a black hole of interruptions, procrastination, and soul-crushing politics. According to Gloria Mark, an informatics professor at UC Irvine, the typical office worker is interrupted or switches tasks every three minutes—hardly enough time to accomplish anything of substance.” (via Kathy Sierra) The

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